Frankenstein, or Ling Ma’s Apocalypse

Where Severance fails, however, is not in its satirical “take-down” of contemporary life. The satirical element of the novel is great.

At the novel’s end, Ma leaves much unresolved — for me, the lack of clarity regarding the mechanism of becoming fevered was especially frustrating — but the bigger issue is that the post-pandemic plot, which constitutes fully half of the novel, feels like something you’ve consumed before.

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Wynter K Miller is an editor and writer in California. @wynterkm

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Wynter K Miller

Wynter K Miller

Wynter K Miller is an editor and writer in California. @wynterkm

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